The Encyclopedia of Arda - an interactive guide to the world of J.R.R. Tolkien
Dates
III 2990 - c. IV 70 (1390 - c.1491 by the Shire-reckoning)
Race
Culture
Family
Meaning
'Peregrin' means 'traveller in strange countries'. The meaning of 'Took' is unknown (the modern version is thought to derive from the Norse god Thor, and cannot relate to Peregrin's family name).
Titles

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About this entry:

  • Updated 5 December 1998
  • Updates planned: 60

Peregrin ‘Pippin’ Took I

Twentieth Shire-thain of the Took line

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Thains of the Shire

The Company of the Ring

Son of Paladin Took II of Great Smials, and later Thain Peregrin I; he travelled with the Company of the Ring. With Meriadoc Brandybuck, he was separated from the Company at Parth Galen, and taken captive by Orcs. Escaping into Fangorn Forest, he saw the destruction of Isengard and travelled with Gandalf to Minas Tirith, where he became a bondsman of Steward Denethor II.

Journey to Rivendell
23 September to 20 October III 3018

Pippin, as Peregrin was universally known, was the youngest of Frodo's companions. He was only twenty-eight years old when he set out with Frodo and Sam from Bag End on the first part of their great journey, which was considered very young for a Hobbit. At first, he seemed to be rather unsuited to a long journey - through the early part of their travels, we see him regularly calling for rests or meals. As befitted the son of the Shire's Thain, though, he had a good general knowledge of that land and its people.

Peregrin's Life After the War of the Ring

Peregrin inherited the title Thain of the Shire in the year IV 13 (1434 by the Shire-reckoning). During his Thainship, he remained in close contact with Gondor, and built a library of great historical importance at Great Smials. The works he collected were mainly concerned with the history of Númenor and the Exiles after its Downfall, and so were of little interest to the Hobbits of the Shire, but were of great significance to the larger world. The Tale of Years was probably prepared at Great Smials, with help from Meriadoc Brandybuck.


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