The Encyclopedia of Arda - an interactive guide to the world of J.R.R. Tolkien
Dates
Visited by the Hobbits Merry and Pippin on 29 February III 3019, and by the Three Hunters on 1 March
Location
Within the southeastern parts of Fangorn Forest, close to the course of the Entwash
Race

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About this entry:

  • Updated 11 November 2019
  • This entry is complete

Treebeard’s Hill

A rocky hill in eastern Fangorn

Treebeard's Hill
Treebeard's Hill within Fangorn (somewhat conjectural)1
Treebeard's Hill within Fangorn (somewhat conjectural)1
"Hill. Yes, that was it. But it is a hasty word for a thing that has stood here ever since this part of the world was shaped."
Treebeard considers his Hill
from The Two Towers III 4,
Treebeard

A stony hill that rose up from among the dense trees within the eastern edge of Fangorn Forest. A flight of rough, broken steps led up to a shelf in the side of the rocky hill, high enough to look out over the treetops of the Forest below. Treebeard the Ent was given to standing on this shelf, surveying his trees on a pleasant morning. It was here that he was first discovered by Merry and Pippin, who thus set in motion the chain of events that would lead to Saruman's defeat and the overthrow of Isengard.

Two days after the Hobbits' encounter, the same Hill was reached by Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli. They found neither Hobbit nor Ent there, but they did have a fateful meeting of their own. It was here that they first encountered Gandalf the White, returned from the depths beneath Moria.


Notes

1

We have no map showing locations within Fangorn Forest, so the positions shown here for places within the wood are based solely on textual references. Thus Treebeard's Hill, as well as Wellinghall and Derndingle, may not have been in exactly the locations shown.

Indexes:

About this entry:

  • Updated 11 November 2019
  • This entry is complete

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