The Encyclopedia of Arda - an interactive guide to the world of J.R.R. Tolkien
Dates
I 307 - I 398 (lived 91 years)1
Race
Division
Culture
Folk of Marach
Family
Third House of the Edain (of which later generations were known as the House of Hador)
Settlements
Dwelt at Estolad, but also spent fourteen years in Hithlum among the Elves
Pronunciation
ma'lach ('ch' as in German 'Bach')
Meaning
Malach appears to be an uninterpretable Mannish name
Other names

Indexes:

About this entry:

  • Updated 14 April 2013
  • This entry is complete

Malach Aradan

The heir of Marach

Encyclopedia of Arda Timeline
Years of the Trees First Age Second Age Third Age Fourth Age and Beyond
Marach
Malach
Aradan

Zimrahin
(Meldis)
Imlach
Adanel
Magor
Other unnamed
children
This genealogical chart includes some characters only mentioned in volume 11 of The History of Middle-earth. Malach's wife was known as Zimrahin in her native Taliska tongue, and also by the Elvish equivalent, Meldis. Malach's eldest daughter Adanel married into the House of Bëor, and thus lay in the ancestry of Beren Erchamion.

The son and heir of Marach of the Third House of the Edain to enter Beleriand. Malach left his father in the settlement at Estolad and travelled west to enter the service of Fingolfin. For fourteen years he dwelt among the Elves in Hithlum, learning their language and culture, so that he became known as Aradan, meaning 'noble man'. Many of Malach's people joined him in Hithlum, but his son Magor was not among them. Instead, he led a party of his people to live among the southern Mountains of Shadow.

From among Malach's descendants, the Lords of Dor-lómin would eventually arise, of whom the first was Malach's great-grandson Hador. The line therefore came to be known as the House of Hador, but all the members of that famous house could claim descent from Malach Aradan of Hithlum.


Notes

1

The dates of Malach's life are given only in a genealogical chart within volume 11 of The History of Middle-earth. They may not therefore be completely reliable, but they do seem consistent with events recorded in The Silmarillion.

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