The Encyclopedia of Arda - an interactive guide to the world of J.R.R. Tolkien
Dates
Morwen became Lady of Dor-lómin when she wedded Húrin in I 464; the land was lost in I 472, but Morwen lived on until I 501
Race
Division
Culture
Family
Descended from the House of Bëor; married into the House of Hador
Settlements
Morwen spent much of her life in the house of Húrin in southern Dor-lómin
Pronunciation
Dor-lómin is pronounced 'd'or loa'min'
Meaning
Dor-lómin means 'land of echoes'
Title of

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  • Updated 9 July 2019
  • This entry is complete

Lady of Dor-lómin

A title of Morwen Eledhwen

"Farewell, Lady of Dor-lómin; we ride now with greater hope than ever we have known before."
Words of Húrin to Morwen, on his departure for the Nirnaeth Arnoediad
from Narn i Chîn Húrin
in Unfinished Tales of Númenor and Middle-earth

A title given to Morwen Eledhwen1, daughter of Baragund, who was wedded to Lord Húrin of Dor-lómin. She was the mother of three children: Lalaith (who died while still very young), Túrin and Niënor. Her husband rode away to the Nirnaeth Arnoediad before Niënor was born, and when he did not return, Morwen sent Túrin away to Doriath to be fostered by King Thingol.

After Morgoth's victory in the great battle, Dor-lómin became overrun by Easterlings, and its former Lady's life was a desperate one. At last, after years of hardship, she fled across the mountains. With her daughter Niënor she followed Túrin to Doriath, only to find that he was no longer there. Pursuing a rumour that he was in Nargothrond, Morwen travelled there, only to find it sacked and deserted - apart from the Dragon Glaurung. Niënor became separated from her mother and her escort, and was enchanted by the Dragon. Under his spell, she fled into the wild. So, Morwen lost not only her homeland and husband, but all three of her children.

For all the tragedy of her life, the Lady of Dor-lómin did not die alone. In her last hours, she was reunited with her husband Húrin, who had been Morgoth's captive for many long years. They met by the grave marker of Túrin and Niënor, and after Morwen's death, Húrin buried his wife in the same place, carving her name on the stone. Legend said that even after the drowning of Beleriand, the grave of the Lady of Dor-lómin survived the deluge, and that an island named Tol Morwen survived to stand among the seas west of Middle-earth.


Notes

1

Actually, there were three Lords of Dor-lómin, and so there would also have been three Ladies. Morwen (who would have been the last of the three) is the only one that we know was specifically addressed by this title, but volume XI of The History of Middle-earth gives us the names of her forerunners. The first of these would have been Gildis, wife to Hador the first Lord of Dor-lómin. The second would have been Húrin's mother (and Morwen's mother-in-law) Hareth, wife to Galdor the second Lord of Dor-lómin.

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About this entry:

  • Updated 9 July 2019
  • This entry is complete

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