The Encyclopedia of Arda - an interactive guide to the world of J.R.R. Tolkien
Dates
The original Lords ruled between II 3320 and III 2; the line was re-established in III 3019
Location
The Two Kingdoms covered large tracts of land in the North and South of Middle-earth
Race
Division
Cultures
Family
Settlements
The capital of the Lords was at Annúminas on Lake Evendim
Other names
Title of
Elendil and Isildur, and later Aragorn, Eldarion and their heirs

Indexes:

About this entry:

  • Updated 1 September 2012
  • This entry is complete
Encyclopedia of Arda Timeline
Years of the Trees First Age Second Age Third Age Fourth Age and Beyond
Elendil
Isildur
Anárion
Elendur
Aratan
Ciryon
Valandil
Three unnamed children
Meneldil
Kings of
Arnor

Kings of
Gondor

Kings of
Arthedain

Kings of
Cardolan
Kings of
Rhudaur
Chieftains of
the Dúnedain

Aragorn
Elessar

Eldarion
Further
Kings

The descent of the Lords of Arnor and Gondor, whose names are shown here in bold text. After the loss of Isildur at the Disaster of the Gladden Fields, there was no Lord of the Two Kingdoms for more than three thousand years until Aragorn succeeded in reestablishing the line.

A title for a lord of Númenórean descent, who held the High Kingship over all the Dúnedain of Middle-earth. It was originally applied to Elendil, but after his death in the War of the Last Alliance, it passed on to his eldest son and heir, Isildur. Isildur did not bear the title long: in only the second year of his reign, while journeying north to his capital at Annúminas, he was ambushed by Orcs and slain. In the events that followed, the rulers of Arnor and Gondor followed different lines of descent from Elendil, and there was no Lord of both Arnor and Gondor for more than three thousand years.

The lines were reunited by Aragorn Elessar, the direct Heir of Isildur through thirty-nine generations, who took up the rule of Gondor and refounded the North-kingdom of Arnor, which had fallen many centuries earlier. Aragorn is not specifically styled 'Lord of Arnor and Gondor', but rather 'King of Gondor and Arnor'. The reason for the change of order is unclear, but it presumably recognised that Gondor had become the more powerful and important of the two realms by the time Aragorn ascended the throne.


For a detailed list of all the known Lords of Arnor and Gondor, see the entry for High King.


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