The Encyclopedia of Arda - an interactive guide to the world of J.R.R. Tolkien
Dates
Part of Gondor from II 3320 or shortly thereafter1
Location
A wide promontory extending into the Bay of Belfalas northwestward of the Mouths of Anduin
Race
Division
Culture
Family
Ruled by the house of the Princes of Dol Amroth (formerly the Princes of Belfalas)
Settlements
Dol Amroth; the townships of Ethring and Linhir, and the Elf-haven of Edhellond, were on the borders of this region
Pronunciation
be'lfalas
Meaning
Uncertain2
Other names
Possibly equivalent to, or at least related to, Dor-en-ernil, the Land of the Prince

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About this entry:

  • Updated 27 July 2015
  • Updates planned: 1

Belfalas

A shoreland fief of Gondor

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Map of Belfalas

Fiefs and regions of Gondor

A promontory and fief of southern Gondor, lying between the mouths of the Rivers Morthond and Gilrain. Its chief city lay at Dol Amroth on its western coasts.


Notes

1

It seems that this region was settled by an independent group of Faithful Númenóreans in the Second Age, before the establishment of Gondor by the sons of Elendil. We have little specific detail about these early settlers, but they gave rise to the noble line of the Princes of Belfalas, and were apparently the ancestors of the Princes of Dol Amroth.

2

Falas is a well-established Elvish word meaning 'shoreline' or 'coast', especially one washed by surf. The Bel- element of Belfalas' name is more difficult to interpret, and indeed Tolkien himself seemed unsure of its origins. In some sources it is interpreted as Sindarin, meaning 'steep' or 'sheer' in reference to its cliffs. Elsewhere the name is seen as coming from an obscure ancient name Bêl for a part of this region, though that name may in turn have been influenced by Elvish.

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