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Probably founded c.III 2480;1 known to have existed in III 29412
Within the Misty Mountains, beneath the High Pass
One secret entrance opened onto the High Pass


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  • Updated 16 January 2015
  • Updates planned: 1


A city of the Orcs

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Years of the Trees First Age Second Age Third Age Fourth Age and Beyond
"And down down to Goblin-town"
Song of the Goblins
from The Hobbit 4
Over Hill and Under Hill

An extensive network of caverns and tunnels excavated by the Goblins in the Misty Mountains east of Rivendell, beneath the High Pass. It was only one of several such communities of the Orcs in the Mountains, and certainly not the most important, but it is well known for its role in the story of Bilbo Baggins. It was here that Thorin and his companions were captured by the Great Goblin, the ruler of the town. At the same time, Bilbo became lost in the Goblins' tunnels, and came across a most precious object: Gollum's Magic Ring, which was later discovered to be none other than the One Ring itself.



Though we don't have a specific date for the founding of Goblin-town, we do have a comment in the Tale of Years (Appendix B to The Lord of the Rings) stating that in c.III 2480 'Orcs begin to make secret strongholds in the Misty Mountains so as to bar all the passes into Eriador.' Though Goblin-town is not mentioned by name here, the description fits so well that it must surely be the intended subject for this annal.


The people of Goblin-town were effectively destroyed in the Battle of Five Armies in III 2941, in which most of its people were killed, and the rest scattered. Goblin-town itself would have remained after this date, and may not have been completely abandoned, but the soldiers it sent out to the Lonely Mountain - the bulk of its people - never returned from the East.

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