The Encyclopedia of Arda - an interactive guide to the world of J.R.R. Tolkien
Dates
Extant during the War of the Ring, III 3019
Location
Ruled the province of Lamedon on the southern slopes of the White Mountains, some two hundred miles westward of Minas Tirith
Race
Division
Culture
Settlements
Uncertain1
Pronunciation
a'ngborr ('rr' emphasises that the final 'r' sound should be pronounced)
Meaning
Uncertain2
Titles

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About this entry:

  • Updated 10 October 2020
  • Updates planned: 1

Angbor

Sturdy Lord of Lamedon

The Lord of Lamedon at the time of the War of the Ring. Famed for his fearlessness in the face of the Grey Host of the Dead, he aided Aragorn in his march to Minas Tirith. He marshalled a force from the southern lands, and rode to garrison the City of Gondor after the departure of Aragorn and the Captains of the West.


Notes

1

We must assume that Angbor held a town within Lamedon, and the only realistic option seems to be Calembel on the river Ciril, though this is nowhere stated explicitly. During the War of the Ring, Angbor fought to defend the fords of Linhir. This might be taken to suggest that Linhir was Angbor's home, but in fact it lay far from the valleys of Lamedon, and it seems that Angbor travelled there - some considerable distance from his own lands - to defend Gondor against invading Corsairs and Haradrim.

2

Angbor's name seems to be composed from the Elvish elements ang 'iron' and bor 'steadfast, faithful', so the full name is interpretable as something like 'steadfast as iron'. This is the meaning most likely intended, but in fact the name Angbor occurs elsewhere in Tolkien's work with a quite different meaning. In The Wanderings of Húrin (in volume XI of The History of Middle-earth), there's mention of a standing stone from which the lords of the Men of Brethil pronounced their judgements, and that stone was also known as Angbor, there said to mean 'doom-rock'. This interpretation comes from the language of the Haladin, and the name's resemblance to that of Angbor of Lamedon is probably no more than a remarkable coincidence.

Indexes:

About this entry:

  • Updated 10 October 2020
  • Updates planned: 1

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