The Encyclopedia of Arda - an interactive guide to the world of J.R.R. Tolkien
Dates
Active III 16341
Race
Division
Descended in part from the Dúnedain
Culture
Family
Descended from Castamir the Usurper, and therefore from a minor branch of the House of Anárion
Settlements
Pronunciation
anga'maiteh ('ai' is pronounced as English 'eye')
Meaning
'Iron-handed'

Indexes:

About this entry:

  • Updated 8 March 2016
  • This entry is complete

Angamaitë

A leader of the Corsairs of Umbar

Encyclopedia of Arda Timeline
Years of the Trees First Age Second Age Third Age Fourth Age and Beyond
Castamir
the Usurper

Unnamed
grandfather(s)
Unnamed
father(s)
Angamaitë
Sangahyando

One probable line of descent of Angamaitë and Sangahyando from Castamir the Usurper.2

One of the great-grandsons of Castamir the Usurper. With Sangahyando, another descendant of Castamir, Angamaitë followed in the footsteps of his treacherous ancestor. He led the Corsairs of Umbar on a devastating raid against the Gondorian port of Pelargir, where they succeeded in ravaging the city and slaying Minardil, the King of Gondor himself. Angamaitë's name comes from the Elvish for 'Iron-handed'.


Notes

1

We have no specific dates of birth or death for Angamaitë, but we know that he was among the leaders of the Corsairs at the time of their slaying of King Minardil in III 1634.

2

All we know for sure about the descent of Angamaitë is that he and Sangahyando were great-grandsons of Castamir, who had usurped the throne of Gondor some two centuries before their time. There's no way to be sure whether they shared the same father (or even the same grandfather) but the fact that they were joint rulers implies that they were fairly closely related. It seems most likely that they were brothers, as shown in the genealogical chart above, but this cannot been established beyond doubt.

See also...

Sangahyando

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