The Encyclopedia of Arda - an interactive guide to the world of J.R.R. Tolkien
Dates
Defiled by Glaurung I 495; destroyed with Beleriand at the end of the First Age
Location
The southern slopes of Ered Wethrin, directly southward from Dor-lómin
Source
The Pools and Falls of Ivrin formed the source of the river Narog
Outflow
From its sources at Ivrin, Narog flowed for many miles southward until it met Sirion in the vale of Nan-tathren
Pronunciation
ay'thel i'vrin
Meaning
Eithel means 'spring'; the derivation of Ivrin is uncertain1
Other names
The Sources of Narog; the Pools and Falls of this region were collectively known simply as Ivrin

Indexes:

About this entry:

  • Updated 29 September 2022
  • This entry is complete

Eithel Ivrin

The Sources of Narog

Map of Eithel Ivrin

The springs that fed a lakeland at the feet of Ered Wethrin, the Mountains of Shadow on the northern borders of Beleriand. Even into the early First Age, Ulmo himself guarded the springs, so that they remained unsullied and undefiled. It was here that Gwindor brought Túrin after he had mistakenly slain his friend Beleg, and the pure waters of Ivrin healed him of the madness of his grief.

The springs did not remain inviolate for all time. As the First Age drew on, Ulmo's powers were withdrawn from the north and Morgoth's strength grew. When Glaurung the Dragon passed by the Pools of Ivrin on his journey to attack Nargothrond, he polluted their crystal purity forever.


Notes

1

Eithel in place-names refers to a spring, well or fountain, typically as the source of a stream or river. That is the case with Eithel Ivrin, which was the source of the long and important river Narog. Typically, Eithel used in a name like this would be followed by the name of the river (so, for example, Eithel Sirion marked the source of the river Sirion), but that pattern does not hold here. Instead, Ivrin refers to the green land where the springs were to be found; its meaning is not absolutely clear, but it perhaps derives from an old word for 'fertile'.

Indexes:

About this entry:

  • Updated 29 September 2022
  • This entry is complete

For acknowledgements and references, see the Disclaimer & Bibliography page.

Original content © copyright Mark Fisher 2004, 2022. All rights reserved. For conditions of reuse, see the Site FAQ.

Website services kindly sponsored by Discus from Axiom Software Ltd.
Discus questionnaires work on the screen or in printed form to suit your needs, in any of dozens of languages.
The Encyclopedia of Arda
The Encyclopedia of Arda
Menu
Homepage Search Latest Entries and Updates Random Entry