The Encyclopedia of Arda - an interactive guide to the world of J.R.R. Tolkien
Dates
Slain in III 2770
Race
Culture
Settlements
Pronunciation
giri'on
Meaning
Uncertain1
Titles

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  • Updated 27 April 2009
  • This entry is complete

Girion

Noble ancestor of Bard the Bowman

Encyclopedia of Arda Timeline
Years of the Trees First Age Second Age Third Age Fourth Age and Beyond
Girion
Unnamed
wife
Unnamed
son
Unnamed
son
Bard I

Lords of Dale

A Lord of Dale who enjoyed the friendship of the Dwarves of nearby Erebor. Girion was a wealthy lord, and Dale in his time was said to contain many fine things. He owned a famous necklace said to be made from five hundred emeralds, which he gave in payment to the Dwarves for a marvellous mail coat2 they created for his eldest son.

Girion's prosperous rule came to a sudden end when the Dragon Smaug descended on Erebor. Dale was also laid waste, and Girion was slain, but his wife and younger son3 were able to escape down the River Running to Esgaroth. There they and their descendants remained, until nearly two hundred years later Girion's descendant Bard succeeded in slaying the Dragon and rebuilding his ancestor's township of Dale.


Notes

1

Girion's name appears to be Elvish, and may contain the element gir- meaning 'quiver' or 'shudder'. It's unclear why that word would be relevant to the Lord of Dale, and it's possible that Tolkien didn't intend Girion's name to have a specific interpretation.

2

This mail coat was said to have been made of pure silver, but nevertheless have been much stronger than steel. This hints that it was actually made of mithril, otherwise known as truesilver.

3

The details of Girion's family are unclear, but we know that he had at least two sons (the elder of which wore the fabulous mail coat). Of the escape from Dale we're told only that his 'wife and child' were able to flee (The Hobbit 14, Fire and Water). The implication seems to be that this child was his younger son (presumably the elder brother was lost with his father in the fall of Dale).

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